In comparison to other drugs, Ketamine is not widely used by young people seeking support. A basic understanding of Ketamine is still important when supporting young people especially because of the dangers of using it with other drugs.

WHAT

Ketamine is a depressant and a hallucinogen. It is often used as a medical anaesthetic and is only legal in this function.

OTHER NAMES

Special K, K, ket, kitkat, super K, wobble.

HOW COMMON IS USING

In 2013, 0.3 per cent of Australians aged over 14 years had used ketamine (National Drug Strategy Household Survey, 2013).

APPEARANCE

White crystalline powder, tablet, pill or liquid.

USE

Snorted, injested or injected.

EFFECTS

‘Floaty’ and detached feelings, physical inability to move, and hallucinations leading to good or bad trips. Large doses exacerbate mental health problems. High is felt within 30 seconds when injected or after five to 20 minutes if snorted or swallowed, and can last an hour or more.

OVERDOSE

Difficulty breathing, seizures or inability to be roused or woken.

An ambulance should be called if any of these symptoms occur.

COMMON MIXERS

Alcohol, Ice and GHB increasing effects and likelihood of overdose.

Didn’t find what you’re looking for? Try the YouthAOD toolbox for further in-depth information or ask YoDAA

SOME COMMON HARM REDUCTION STRATEGIES

Encourage a young person to: -